Friday, July 18, 2014

The three little fishies

Our kids go swimming in the pool pretty much every single day from April through October, as well as a few days a week in March and November, when the water is almost too cold. By "almost too cold" I mean 70 degrees, which is my threshold for letting them go swimming.

All that chlorine in the water was really doing a number on the girls' hair this year. Miriam loves jumping in and diving underwater, so her hair was getting drenched every time she went swimming. Her hair became dry and brittle, and the ends were feeling like plastic doll hair - yikes!



I found these cute little swim caps on Amazon, and must say they work great! Only the hair around the very edges of the cap gets a little damp during swimming now, no matter how wildly the girls play in the pool. They go on pretty easily, though it helps that I braid their hair first. At age 7, with hair all the way down to her hips, this swim cap still fits Miriam well, though I doubt it will still work next year.

The girls also came up with a fun little game, "The three little fishes and the big bad shark." The big bad shark being one of their brothers chasing them around the pool. 

No affiliate links or anything - just wanted to say these swim caps are cute and very good at keeping the girls' hair dry. :)

12 comments:

  1. This is meant to be a sincere question and not intended as a criticism. I understand your commitment to modesty. I would say I too prefer modest wear, though I have a more liberal interpretation of what that mean - I swim in a sleeveless, skirted bathing suit with a UV swim shirt (rash guard) on top. I have also been known to use swim shorts and a swim shirt in private swimming pools.

    The younger girls seem to have more fitted swim dresses, but your oldest seems to have a loose swim dress - unless that is just a cover up. I find flowing swim outfits interfere with my swimming and make me feel burdened, even unsafe. Do you ever have concerns regarding safety and looser fitting swimwear? Would you be comfortable with swim shorts/shirts, or swim skirts and shirts that are more fitted?

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    1. I actually used the same pattern for all three swim dresses (http://www.simply-modest.com/posecom/categories.php?category=Sewing-Patterns), but the fabric I used for Miriam's did not hold up as well as the other girls'. It's thinner and losing much of its elasticity. Now in it's second swim season, it is definitely nearing the end of its useable life. Typically, I only sew the girls new swim outfits every other year, though Miriam should probably have had a new one this season. Here is what it looked like new: http://stevenandersonfamily.blogspot.com/2013/06/summer-project-new-swim-suits.html

      The pattern includes skin-tight, knee-length leggings under the outer skirt, but they are not visible in the photos. However, I strayed from the original pattern in that rather than making a separate top/skirt, and leggings, I sew the leggings to the top in their swim dresses, making it all one piece. This requires a zipper to be added down the middle of the back. I did this because the top would otherwise float up when they jump in, etc.

      I wear a similar swim outfit to theirs (www.wholesomewear.com), and have never found it to be restrictive, burdensome, or unsafe. The fabric (Lycra) moves effortlessly in the water. The girls all play boisterously in the pool, including jumping and diving.

      As long as I am swimming in my own private pool, I have no problem with swim shorts/skirt and a shirt. Sometimes, I choose to wear that when I am swimming by myself because it is easier to change in and out of in case baby wakes up and needs me.

      Hope this helps :)

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  2. Different anon here. I also love the fishy caps. I used to give them out as prizes to my little swim team girls when they completed certain skills, each color was a different skill when they were in the 5-8 age range. I ran a very small club so it was an affordable and fun prize. A couple of other companies that have fun designs but in the larger youth/adult silicone sizes are sporti and 1line, they both tend to hold up well.

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    1. Thank you for that tip! I was wondering what brand was larger than kids, but smaller than adult. Will order those next year for the oldest two!

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  3. Hey,
    You can also try homemade hair conditioners 2-3 times a week to help that brittle hair get healthy and shiny again. Plus, it's a spa activity so it feels comforting, pleasant and fun. And that feeling and smell of your hair after the treatment sessions, that's priceless.

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    1. Do you have a particular recipe you like? I have not had luck with homemade hair products. I tried putting straight coconut oil on, but it was a mess.

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    2. I totally giggled because I once tried coconut oil and I had to use laundry soap to wash it out, no amount of shampoo worked... other time I almost puked, I tried out the good ole eggs-and-yeast horror. I don't want to begin to describe it. And that stench afterwards...
      Point is: every diy hair conditioner requires some sort of oily or greasy material.
      I can recommend olive oil plus honey and a vanilla or other scents. Leave it on for a good 15-20 minutes, wrapping tin foil around the girls's heads will help intensify the process given the heat it generates. Rinse thoroughly, THEN use shampoo once or twice. If you use conditioner, the simplest, most inexpensive herbal shampoo will do, that come in large bottles for mostly hairdresser salons. The LAST rinse should be the good ole vinegar-and-lukewarm-water rinse. That will take care of the remaining bits of fatty stuff from the conditioner and will turn your girls' thick hair into a shimmery, shiny, glowing head of hair. It's quite a procedure but if you spend the wait with a good ole sugar-ginger-olive oil-citrus foot scrub, it's a total spa experience. Good luck!

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  4. Somewhat along the lines of the first question above, and I hope you will pardon me for asking, but what do the girls wear under their swim dresses? I only ask because I was thinking of making one for my daughter, but I am puzzled as to what to have her wear underneath so that when she goes into the water and the dress billows up, she is not exposed.

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    1. Please see my answer to the first comment above.

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  5. Although I agree the skirts appear cumbersome and uncomfortable to swim in, being able to swim in long, clinging and saturated clothing is an important part of survival swimming. Very strong swimmers have hit trouble when unexpectedly falling in as they have only learned to swim in a minimum of clothing and the extra weight and drag of a full outfit is not something they have contended with. I may not feel the necessity for modest swimwear, but the girls learning to swim in these garments is a very useful skill should they fund themselves in an emergency.

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  6. We went swimming recently in a salt water pool which felt great--no burning eyes or dried out hair. I don't know much about it, but I wonder if you could switch to salt water.

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  7. My father builds and maintains swimming pools for a living, and I must second the salt water pool suggestion. It's nowhere like seawater in the amount of salt, brackish at worst. It replaces chlorination with chlorine tablets/powder (which often include other substances), instead the Chlorine and Sodium in salt (regular salt, like the one used for cooking) is separated using electricity at the water purifying equipment. Often, a pH (acidity) measuring and acid dossifier system is installed at the same time.
    The inversion comes at about 2000€ between the two, including installation, though it's becoming cheaper as time goes by. The cost in salt and acid (in ~35% water solution) is negligible, as they are cheap and after the first load it only needs a small addition of salt and a new acid 25 liter "bottle" about once a year.
    The water quality is indeed leaps and bounds above tablet chlorination. All pools my father has built in the last five or so years (over one a month) have had them installed, with few exceptions, and he has also done a few installs on existing pools.
    If you go to public pools or community pools, petition them to have those installed, and mention how they are cost-saving devices in the long run (chlorine tablets are not cheap, least of all when compared to salt by the sackfull).

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