Friday, September 6, 2013

Weekly Lesson Plans

Here are a glimpse at this year's lesson plans, laid out by week. Basically, there is one line per child, color-coded, which tells them where they should be at in each subject by the end of the week. Solomon: green (8th grade), Isaac: orange (6th grade), John: yellow (4th grade), Miriam: pink (2nd grade), Becky: purple (1st grade). Subjects that we work on together are shown in white across the respective rows of those children.





Bible Reading and Memory
Math
Reading
Writing
Spelling
Grammar/ Comp.
Science/ Social Studies
Other daily subjects

Other weekly subjects


Week 1

Aug. 26
Aug. 31


8/27 First Day of School

4 chapters per day

Psalm 31
Saxon Math Algebra II,
lessons 1-3
non-fiction reading pertaining to weekly topic
1 page per day in Pentime 8
--
LLATL
Lesson 1
Abeka Science 8: lessons 1-5
German
S:
I:
J:

Piano Practice
S:
I:
J:
M:

Typing
S:
I:
J:
M:

Story time

related art/craft:
7-day creation collage

related meal:
fruit salad

related activity: write to Dr. Hovind

field trip:
AZSC class

ASL

P.E.

piano lesson

Great Science Adventures: Earth’s Landforms


ATTA: Creation to Flood

7 days of creation, Young Earth

astronomy

heliocentricity vs. geocentricity



daily portion


Psalm 31
Saxon Math 87,
lessons A-3
non-fiction reading pertaining to weekly topic
1 page per day in  Pentime 6
R&S, grade 6, Lesson 1
LLATL through p. 10

daily NT portion  

Psalm 31
Harcourt Math 4 chapter 1 (up to p. 15)
non-fiction reading pertaining to weekly topic
1 page per day in  Pentime 4
R&S, grade 4, Lesson 1
LLATL Book Study A (through p.11)

Bible time with Mom
Harcourt Math 2 through p. I
Handbook for Reading,
Learning Letter Sounds
1 page per day in  Pentime 1B
R&S, grade 2, Lesson 1
LLATL Red Book
R&S I and J workbooks

Harcourt Math 1 through p. I
Handbook for Reading,
Learning Letter Sounds
1 page per day in  Pentime 1 A
LLATL Blue Book

R&S D-J workbooks


Week 2

Sept. 2
Sept. 7

9/2 Labor Day
4 chapters per day

Psalm 31
Saxon Math Algebra II,
lessons 4-6, Test 1
non-fiction reading pertaining to weekly topic
1 page per day in Pentime 8
--
LLATL
Lesson 2
Abeka Science 8:  lessons 6-10
German
S:
I:
J:

Piano Practice
S:
I:
J:
M:

Typing
S:
I:
J:
M:

Story time

related art/craft:
learn to draw animals

related meal:
fig bars

related activity: sleep in a tent

field trip:
BBQ and apple/pear picking at Date Creek Ranch

ASL

P.E.

piano lesson

Great Science Adventures: Earth’s Landforms


ATTA: Creation to Flood

Truth about “human ancestors”

harp, organ

iron, brass

cattle, trees

dwellings: tents


daily portion


Psalm 31
Saxon Math 87,
lessons 4-8
non-fiction reading pertaining to weekly topic
1 page per day in  Pentime 6
R&S, grade 6, Lesson 2
LLATL through p. 18

daily NT portion

Psalm 31
Harcourt Math 4 chapter 2 (up to p. 31)
non-fiction reading pertaining to weekly topic
1 page per day in  Pentime 4
R&S, grade 4, Lesson 2
LLATL Lesson 1 (through p.20)

Bible time with Mom
Harcourt Math 2 through p. 12
Handbook for Reading,
Learning Letter Sounds
1 page per day in  Pentime 1B
R&S, grade 2, Lesson 2
LLATL Red Book
R&S I and J workbooks

Harcourt Math 1 through p. 12
Handbook for Reading,
Learning Letter Sounds
1 page per day in  Pentime 1 A
LLATL Blue Book

R&S D-J workbooks


  
The daily subjects have room to allow for check marks behind each name. When we are done with a certain subject for the week, that box gets crossed out.


We have used this system for several years, and it works well for us. It gives structure and guidance, keeping everyone on track, without being overly detailed. It's simple enough for the kids to read themselves, yet keeps them accountable.

9 comments:

  1. I can't remember the last time I handwrote anything for an employer. Even job applications come in over the internet. I think the "pentime" work may not be a good use of time.

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  2. Neat! Thanks for sharing Zsuzsa. I must sheepishly admit, that in past years I have always *tried* to put together a schedule similar to yours. However, I just get so bogged down doing the schedule, that I give it up before it's even finished! Hats off to you! I hope you're all enjoying being back at your studies.

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  3. Learning to use your hands to write neatly is not a good use of time? Besides the absolute shame of considering not being able to provide clean, legible penmanship I have to wonder...physician script cards, class notes, book margins, shopping lists or even the simple pleasure of sitting down to write one's thoughts, poetry, draw out a musician composition or a short story. Choosing not to become completely dependent upon technology as the sole source of legible and reliable communication is certainly not a bad thing - look at the idiocy of spell check on both children's and adult's grammar.

    Thank goodness some people still care about penmanship!

    Andrea

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  4. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson , a question. I was checking out the Poetry Blog. What happen to this blog. Will there be more poetry by Pastor Anderson and how about Clint Anderson? Very well written sir. Thank you Rosita Poetry is awesome when written well. :) I am serious, really. Thank you for your time and most important of all you do for the Lord. <3

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  5. I believe the "pentime" is very valuable. There is no reason they should not learn cursive, printing and calligraphy. Many of the children today cannot write cursive or read it and when they graduate from a public school, they are semi-illiterate. I am old enough to have learned shorthand as well and could take dictation at 150 wpm. I do not regret having learned "penmanship" but I am also a speed typist and can get around on the internet. Your children should not be limited by the current mindsets of society today. I applaud you and admire you for all the things you do for your family.

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  6. I agree, Anonymous. College applications, job applications, medical forms, tax forms, banking forms, etc. are all electronic now. Penmanship practice may help with developing hand-eye coordination for young children, but beyond that, I don't see a reason to spend so much time on it.

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  7. Nice! I like it. Thanks for sharing!

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  8. Zsuzsanna - I thoroughly enjoy seeing your homeschool schedule posts...but you always post the final product. Any chance you could write a post about HOW you make this? How you decide what material to cover and how to spread it out over the year? It's the initial organization of the material that is daunting for me (my son will be "in" preschool this year)...so I'd love to see your thought process.

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  9. Zsuzanna, I think you might enjoy this infographic describing homeschooling in the United States.

    http://www.topmastersineducation.com/homeschooled/

    Enjoy!

    ReplyDelete

Your KINDLY WORDED, constructive comments are welcome, whether or not they express a differing opinion. All others will be deleted without second thought.